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Oats for All

See how we made Cheerios gluten‑free.

It all starts with oats.

Cheerios have always been made of oats, which are naturally gluten‑free.

Many farmers who grow oats rotate their crops.

That means they also grow grains that have gluten (like wheat, barley, and rye).

These grains get mixed in with the oats during harvesting and transport.

To make Cheerios gluten‑free,we have to separate them from the oats.

All the oats are sifted.

Our sifter sorts out the grains of barley, wheat, and rye, which are different sizes and shapes than oats.

How do you make Cheerios gluten‑free?

Every batch of oats is tested to make sure it has less than 20 parts per million of other grains.

That means, on average, for every 15,000 grains of oats, there can be no more than one grain of wheat, barley, or rye.

What does “20 parts per million” really mean?

Did you know?

To make gluten‑free Cheerios, our sifter has to sort

3.5 million pounds of oats every day.

Then, the oats are milled into flour.

The oats go to a mill that’s dedicated to making gluten‑free flour.

Checkmark

Once the oats are milled, the flour is checked to make sure it’s still gluten‑free.

The oat flour gets shipped to the plant.

Checkmark

The flour travels in our dedicated gluten‑free trucks and rail cars on its way to becoming Cheerios.

And then it’s made into Cheerios.

Using the same recipe as always, we puff and toast the oat flour into Cheerios.

How do I know the way you make Cheerios is safe?
Checkmark

The finished Cheerios are checked once more to ensure they’re gluten‑free.

Sun! Cloud Cloud Cloud Cloud Barn
Oats for All
See how we made Cheerios gluten‑free.

It all starts with oats.

Cheerios have always been made of oats, which are naturally gluten‑free.
Oats Oats Oats
Grains Falling

First, the oats are harvested.

Tractor Running over Crops
Grains Falling Grains Falling Grains Falling Grains Falling Grains Falling Grains Falling Grains Falling Grains Falling

Many farmers who grow oats rotate their crops.

That means they also grow grains that have gluten (like wheat, barley, and rye).

These grains get mixed in with the oats during harvesting and transport.

To make Cheerios gluten‑free, we have to separate them from the oats.

Grain Pile
Grain Pile
Grain Gap Grain Gap Grain Gap
Grain Pile
Grain Pile
Falling Grains

All the oats are sifted.

Our sifter sorts out the grains of barley, wheat, and rye, which are different sizes and shapes than oats.

Every batch of oats is tested to make sure it has less than 20 parts per million of other grains.

That means, on average, for every 15,000 grains of oats, there can be no more than 1 grain of wheat, barley, or rye.
What does “20 parts per million” really mean?
Sifted Oats

Did you know?

To make gluten‑free Cheerios, our sifter has to sort

3.5 million pounds
of oats every day.

Big Pile of Oats Falling Big Pile of Oats Falling Big Pile of Oats Falling Big Pile of Oats Falling
Mill Mill

Then, the oats are milled into flour.

The oats go to a mill that’s dedicated to making gluten‑free flour.
Checkmark

Once the oats are milled, the flour is checked to make sure it’s still gluten‑free.

Truck

The oat flour gets shipped to the plant.

Checkmark

The flour travels in our dedicated gluten‑free trucks and rail cars on its way to becoming Cheerios.

And then it’s made into Cheerios.

Using the same recipe as always, we puff and toast the oat flour into Cheerios.
Checkmark

The finished Cheerios are checked once more to ensure they’re gluten‑free.

Cheerios Falling into Box
Apple Cinnamon Cheerios Frosted Cheerios Cheerios Honey Nut Cheerios Multi Grain Cheerios